Tag Archives: Manchester

Eastercon: Mancunicon convention report 2016!

This year’s science-fiction/fantasy convention EASTERCON took place in Manchester, England. Mancunicon, as it was called, occupied four floors of the iconic Hilton Hotel, a slender glass-and-steel building shaped like the number “1”. The convention gathered together sci-fi and fantasy authors, fans, publishers, gamers and cosplayers. There were almost a thousand people in attendance, and one of them was yours truly.

The Hilton Tower... in the sun.

The Hilton Tower… in the sun.

 

Now, I’ve been to FantasyCon before and the odd sci-fi movie fan convention. But I’ve never been to Eastercon, so I was unsure what to expect. Fortunately, some friends of mine from the Manchester Speculative Fiction Group were also there, so there was always someone to chat (or moan) to.

The first thing we did was gather at the bar. This was (unsurprisingly) the focal point for the Con. However, the Hilton is a very tall, narrow building so sometimes the bar became very crowded. This never became a real problem, but it did make queuing for the two lifts difficult. The small meeting rooms also meant that several panels were oversubscribed. I was sorry to have missed the panel on rare sci-fi and fantasy TV shows of the 1950s -1970s. But on the whole things ran pretty smoothly.

The atmosphere was, for the most part, very friendly, with everyone united by a love of sci-fi and fantasy. Although some were more hard-core than others – there was a cosplay competition on Saturday for those dedicated enough. I am not the most gregarious person in the world. But even I found myself chatting to a diverse array of people over the weekend.

My writing group has an anthology called “REVOLUTIONS” out at the moment, so this was an ideal place to plug the book. We sneaked up a few posters and shifted quite a few copies. My only regret was that I didn’t manage to prepare any advertising material for my own novel. But then Easter always sneaks up on me.

The events programme was varied and jam-packed. This year’s guests of honour were authors Sarah Pinborough, David L Clements, Aliette de Bodard, and Ian MacDonald. But many more took part, and topics ranged from hard sci-fi to sewing. So there was something for everyone… even a cookery class!

So after catching up with my fellow attendees, I made my way to the first panel…

Welcome to Eastercon – Saturday

This was highly informative and useful. It soon became apparent that Eastercon has a culture all of its own. Some people had been going literally all their lives, while the oldest member was a mere 90 years old.

Afterwards, I browsed the dealers’ rooms. Against my better judgment I gave into temptation and walked away with an armful of beautiful 1970s paperback editions. But some deals are just too good to pass up!

Diversity in SF

The first panel I attended was about diversity in SF/F. This was a very intelligent and nuanced discussion about how difficult it is for authors who are not white and middle class to get published. The speakers made their points with eloquence and precision. Afterwards, I found myself with a far greater appreciation of issues of race and gender.

MSF Group’s “Crit Sandwich” – Saturday and Sunday

Next day, Manchester’s SpecFic group held the first of two long feedback sessions for budding authors. My fellow group members and I reviewed 3 pieces each day of up to 10,000 words per author. The sessions were very enjoyable, with some interesting, varied and (intentionally) amusing samples of work. All those who took part said they found it very useful. I take my hat off to them, as I’m not sure if I’d have had the courage to submit my work to complete strangers at my first Eastercon!

Jo Fletcher Books Launch – Sebastian de Castell

There were several book launches over the weekend. We ascended the lift to the Presidential Suite on the 22nd floor for a reading by the author. The view and the plentiful red wine made this a memorable occasion, and the publishers were open to questions from anyone who attended. Indeed, the wine flowed a little too freely on occasion, with several people complaining of feeling “under the weather” as the Con wore on!

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..And the view from the 22nd storey in the rain.

 

The Fuzzy Set of Horror

That evening I attended a lively discussion on the boundaries of horror, given by three gothic/supernatural fantasy writers with helpful contributions from horror grandmaster Ramsey Campbell. There were some hotly debated questions about Waterstones’ policy of no longer segregating horror from fantasy and science-fiction as well as on the merits of zombie films.

Later, we sampled the gastronomic delights of Manchester (there are many) before returning to a packed bar and hobnobbing with anyone who would talk to us. But after over ten hours on my feet, I was exhausted. So I limped off to bed to grab four hours’ sleep before Day Three.

Trailblazing Comics of the 1980s – Sunday

Next morning – my head buzzing with a litre of coffee – I took part in my first ever panel. Thankfully, it was a subject I can ramble on about for hours – comic books. My fellow panellists Karen Brenchley and Tony Keen provided the focus of the debate. Together, we discussed which creators shaped the comics field in the 1980s and beyond.

Inevitably, “The Dark Knight Returns” and “Watchmen” were mentioned. But we also managed to include such diverse matters as 2000AD, John Byrne, and “Cerebus the Aardvark”! The attendees called us on our knowledge, so we had to be on our toes. But we all brought something different to the table and managed to give the audience a broad overview of both mainstream and indie comics in the decade. Afterwards, we got chatting to several interesting people. I enjoyed this a heck of a lot and would thoroughly recommend the experience.

Kaffeeklatsch with Sarah Pinborough

Guest of honour at this year’s Eastercon was horror/crime/YA novelist Sarah Pinborough. Fresh from Hollywood, Sarah shared tales of writing and more in this cosy setting. This was a nice change of pace from the panels and a chance to ask more detailed questions of the author. As for the content, I’m afraid I can’t tell you more because, as Sarah says, “What happens in Kaffeeklatsch stays in Kaffeeklatsch!”

Author Reading – open mic

This two-hour session gave authors a chance to read their own work. My nerves were set on edge by the announcement that it was to be a competition. When the “judges” were given sticks with numbers on, the whole thing took on the aspect of a David Lynch film. Authors read their works until a gong signalled they had run over the time limit, whereupon the judges gave the scores. Fortunately, the whole thing was just a bit of fun. The readings were diverse and entertaining, and the host excellent. Although I really felt for one poor chap who had only written his piece that morning.

SF Pub Quiz

Late on Sunday, we took part in the hardest pub quiz I have ever seen in my life. Categories ranged from “Name the scientific instrument” to “Name the TV theme tune… and composer”. Needless to say, our score was abysmal!

By this stage everyone was relaxed and the party mood was in full swing. It was with a heavy heart that I retired to bed in the early hours, knowing that there was only half a day to go.

The Deeper the Grief, the Closer to Life – Monday

By Monday a few people were looking the worse for wear. But a crowded audience still packed out the main room to listen to a panel about grief and loss. Despite the heavy subject matter, the talk proved to be worth waiting for. Authors Sarah Pinborough and Neil Williamson discussed writing about grief, as well as recounting real-life tales, both sad and funny. This was definitely one of the better talks, although I can’t really remember why!

Criminality in SF/F

The final panel of the day got a little raucous at times, as several authors discussed the representation of crime in sci-fi and fantasy novels. By this stage we were all just relaxing. Some great debates arose, though. One of which may have just given me an idea for my next story…

In Conclusion

Eastercon was something of an unknown quantity for me. At first I found the fan-based culture a little intimidating. But having it in Manchester helped my travel plans and allowed me to stay much longer.

Given the unique challenges of the Hilton tower, the organisers did their best to keep things running smoothly. Volunteers were always present to help, and being on a panel was tremendous fun.

If I had any suggestions it would be to offer more author readings and to include more horror. At the moment, Eastercon is quite “sci-fi heavy”.

So will I be going to another Eastercon? Hell, yeah. I’d recommend it to anyone and everyone who likes genre fiction.

Will I be more prepared next time? Definitely!

 

Update on Revolutions Anthology! (sort of)

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Been relatively busy recently so this will be a short-ish post. Over the past few weeks I’ve been editing The Manchester Speculative Fiction Group’s first ever anthology, “REVOLUTIONS”, together with my co-editors. This is a science-fiction/horror/fantasy compendium of short stories, all loosely connected to my home town of Manchester, England in some way. So I thought I would take a moment to share some insights into Manchester.

Manchester is a city that is close to my heart. Like a piece of shrapnel from a bullet wound that is lodged there. I don’t think I’m alone in having a love/hate relationship with the city. On the one hand, it has a proud industrial heritage, a lively student population, the BBC, world-class football, great shopping, and architecture so good they filmed part of “Captain America” here. On the other hand it suffered greatly from urban decay, has sprawling council estates, and the levels of high crime, poverty and homelessness associated with many inner cities. And did I mention the football?

In recent years Manchester has changed again, with the creation of the rather Bohemian Northern Quarter section, full of quirky cafes and bars. Manchester today is a city in flux.

If you want to know what Manchester is like, you can see a rather sanitized version of it here…

Manchester's lovely Town Hall.

Manchester’s lovely Town Hall.

or here…

 

A rather nice leafy suburb in Greater Manchester.

A rather nice leafy suburb in Greater Manchester.

 

…or here are some rather less flattering images:

Manchester town centre.

Manchester town centre.

 

Or here…

Brunswick council estate, Manchester.

Brunswick council estate, Manchester.

Or perhaps here…

Studentville, Manchester.

Studentville, Manchester.

 

Like it or loathe it, Manchester has always been fertile ground for poets, artists, writers and musicians. There’s something about the place that inspires escapism. Perhaps it’s all that industrial age architecture (while some of the new buildings in the city centre are straight out of a science-fiction novel) or the twisting back alleys that could hold unexpected tales of horror or fantasy. In any case, it has inspired some fascinating stories that hopefully we’ll be sharing with you in the coming months.

Until then, here are some of the famous (or notorious) people who have come from the city:

Anthony Burgess (A Clockwork Orange novelist), Professor Brian Cox (physicist and TV presenter), The Stone Roses, LS Lowry (artist), The Bee Gees, Robert Donat (actor), Oasis, The Hollies, Joy Division and New Order, Davy Jones (The Monkees), David Lloyd George (Prime Minister), Ian McShane (actor), Emmeline Pankhurst (Suffragette),Thomas De Quincey (novelist), The Happy Mondays, John Thaw (actor), 10cc, The Buzzcocks, Elkie Brooks (Singer), Elbow, Georgie Fame (Singer), George Formby (comedy actor), Manchester United Football Club, Freddie and the Dreamers, Herman’s Hermits, John Mayall and the Bluesbreakers, Morrissey and The Smiths, Sad Café, Lisa Stansfield, Simply Red, The Verve, Stephen Leather (novelist), Nicholas Royle (novelist), Bernard Hill (actor Titanic, Lord of the Rings), David Warner (actor Tron, The Omen), Jack Wild (child actor Oliver!), Harold Shipman (Britain’s biggest ever serial killer), Beryl Reid (actress), The Moors Murderers, Frances Hodgson Burnett (The Secret Garden novelist), Winston Churchill (Born in Oxfordshire but MP for Oldham and then MP for Manchester North-West).

Maybe we’ll see more names added to the list after the anthology!