Tag Archives: horror story

The Autumn Man is out now!

As promised, you can now buy my novel THE AUTUMN MAN as either an e-book or softcover book from Amazon.com, courtesy of Solstice Publishing, you lucky people!

THE AUTUMN MAN is a gripping tale of horror and the paranormal.

Here’s a taste of what you can expect…

“Milton is a small, industrial Northern England town where nothing ever happens. But all that is about to change. When grieving schoolteacher Megan Vervain rents her spare room to an enigmatic loner named Amon, she starts to suspect something about her new lodger is odd; he spends his night studying maps of the town, looking for something in its ancient past. Soon, bizarre events occur: local people go missing, graves are robbed, and a terrifying beast stalks human prey at night.

“Another stranger has come to Milton – the lustful, murderous Von Daniken. For centuries, he and Amon have been searching for the same mystical item known as the Cure. Now, they have found it, and the town of Milton is about to become an apocalyptic battleground for their final showdown.”

More information will be coming soon. But for now, head over to Amazon to read a sample for FREE!

 

 

The big reveal!

As promised, here is my big news for all of you who like horror and fantasy novels. If you’re looking for the latest horror, paranormal or dark fantasy fiction, you could do worse than choose to read THE AUTUMN MAN… by yours truly!

 

The plot is a carefully kept secret, but just between you and me I can tell you that this is a contemporary supernatural story with a twist. And what a twist! You’ll never see it coming…

I’m super proud of this book. It’s the product of a lot of sweat, blood, tears, and yet more blood. As you’ll find out for yourself when you read it! So if you like your Stephen King mixed with a little Clive Barker, a dash of Anne Rice, and a healthy dose of Guillermo del Toro, this is the book for you!

More details coming soon as to how you can get your hands on a copy of what I’m sure is going to be the hottest read of the summer, if I don’t say so myself! (Never let it be said that I hide my light under a bushel).

In the meantime thanks for stopping by, and don’t forget to keep coming back for more news on this exciting new title and some exclusive freebies!

The Autumn Man. He’s coming… soon!

The Horror Masterworks series!

In this post, I thought it would be fun to create my own list of Horror Masterworks books containing the greatest horror novels and short stories of all time.

The idea struck me because a while ago Gollancz brought out a series of Science Fiction Masterworks. These contained seminal sci-fi novels considered some of the best sci-fi novels of all time, such as Arthur C Clarke’s Childhood’s End, Joe Haldeman’s The Forever War and Robert Silverberg’s The Book of Skulls as well as the obligatory PK Dick books. The series was an introduction to many authors readers might not be familiar with.

This was followed soon after by another series of Fantasy Masterworks with books such as Lord Dunsany’s The King of Elfland’s Daughter and George R R Martin’s Fevre Dream. However, due to less success this time around, plans for a Horror Masterworks series were apparently shelved. It might also have been due to the fact that some of the “fantasy” tiles were in fact horror, or even science-fiction as in Jack Finney’s Time and Again.

 

Another mislabelled "Science Fiction Masterwork".

Another mislabelled “Science Fiction Masterwork”.

 

There has been a huge reticence by major publishers and booksellers recently to acknowledge the horror field. Yet despite this, horror is booming. Horror films like The Conjuring and the Paranormal Activity series have accounted for some of the most profitable Hollywood films this century. Horror novels continue to appear regularly on Amazon’s Top Selling Books list.  The public, it seems, thirsts for horror, even if publishers don’t want to supply it.

In conclusion, it seems unfair that Sci-fi and Fantasy should get their own Masterworks series while Horror is left out. So without further ado, here are my recommendations for Gollancz’s non-existent  Horror Masterworks series!

 

THE HORROR MASTERWORKS COLLECTION THAT SHOULD HAVE BEEN…

  1. H P Lovecraft, The Call of Cthulhu & Others
  2. Ray Bradbury, The October Country
  3. Richard Matheson, I Am Legend
  4. Shirley Jackson, The Haunting of Hill House
  5. Mary Shelley, Frankenstein
  6. Bram Stoker, Dracula
  7. Robert Louis Stevenson, The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll & Mr Hyde
  8. Peter Straub, Ghost Story
  9. James Herbert, The Rats
  10. Stephen King, The Shining
  11. Anne Rice, Interview with the Vampire
  12. Charles L Grant, The Hour of the Oxrun Dead
  13. Clive Barker, Cabal
  14. Ramsey Campbell, The Doll Who Ate His Mother
  15. Arthur Machen, The Great God Pan
  16. Robert Bloch, Psycho
  17. William Hope Hodgson, The House on the Borderland
  18. Sheridan Le Fanu, Through A Glass Darkly
  19. Roald Dahl, Kiss Kiss
  20. M R James, Ghost Stories of an Antiquary
  21. Ira Levin, Rosemary’s Baby
  22. Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Grey
  23. Edgar Allen Poe, Tales of Mystery and Imagination
  24. Thomas Ligotti, Teatro Grottesco
  25. Laird Barron, Occultation
  26. Robert R McCammon, Boy’s Life
  27. Daphne Du Maurier, The Birds
  28. Brett Easton Ellis, American Psycho
  29. Henry James, The Turn of the Screw
  30. Ray Bradbury, Something Wicked This Way Comes
  31. William Peter Blatty, The Exorcist
  32. Algernon Blackwood, Ancient Sorceries & other Chilling Tales
  33. Charles Dickens, Ghost Stories
  34. Rudyard Kipling, The Mark of the Beast & Other Stories

As you can see, there is plenty for horror fans to sink their teeth into.

One word of warning: this is not a list of personal favourites (although many of them are) or a list of the most scariest books of all time. Instead, I’ve tried to balance true masters in the field with their most notable works, either because the book set a new bar in the genre, or because it is their most representative work. I’ve also tried to include some modern writers such as Thomas Ligotti and Laird Barron to show you that horror is not dead but is in fact alive and well and still growing, albeit a little more in the dark these days!

I hope you enjoy the list. Feel free to disagree, and be sure to let me know what you think about the list in the comments below!

Pleasant dreams!

 

 

Exciting news!

I am very happy to report that my latest novel “The Autumn Man” is going to be published in the very near future!

I’ll release more details when and as I can, but this is a horror novel that is very close to my heart.

You can read my fist novel, the sci-fi horror “Project Nine” here.

The story behind how  both “The Autum Man” and “Project  Nine” got published is an epic one and I will share it with you at some point in the future. But for now, I’m just excited  and looking forward to sharing more with you as this develops. Stay tuned for a sneak preview of the cover and for more screenwriting tips and secrets!

 

Link

This is pretty exciting news. My vampire novel PROJECT NINE is now available as an e-book on Amazon!

But this isn’t your usual horror story. It contains science-fiction, mad scientists, government conspiracies and, although it has its fair share of spinetingling romance,  you won’t find any sparkly vampires here!

PROJECT NINE  is the story of a young man named Luke who lives in a small Iowa town and who dreams of an escape from his own mortality. He finds it when he meets Lynne, a beautiful drifter who offers him eternal life. But the price is an insatiable addiction to human blood.

FrontCover2

What Luke does not know is that Lynne has escaped from The Tower, a secret government installation hidden in the cornfields of  the American Midwest. Within its walls, a clandestine experiment has gone terribly wrong. Aimed at breeding a new generation of super-soldiers, the Project has instead created genetically engineered creatures who live in darkness and feed on the blood of others.

Now, pursued across the country by an obsessive detective, Lynne and her fellow test subjects roam America’s backwoods in their quest for victims.

And Luke has joined them.

But theirs is no romantic existence: it is a world of spiralling violence where Luke must kill each night to survive. He is about to find out that his new life is very different to what he imagined…

WHAT’S IT LIKE?

PROJECT NINE is equal parts Stephen King, Anne Rice, Michael Crichton, Phillip K Dick, and Mary Shelley.

These vampires are psychologically realistic, damaged people. And the science behind their creation is so believable that, according to several sources, it’s even technically possible!

I’ll be telling you more about the characters, human and otherwise, in later posts.

WHERE CAN I BUY IT?

You can buy PROJECT NINE on Amazon as an e-book here.

Or in the UK you can get it here.

If you don’t have a Kindle, don’t worry, you can simply download Amazon’s own free e-reader for PC or smartphone when you buy. It’s so easy, even I did it!

You can also read a free sample before you download it. So why are you still here? Just click on one of the links above to get reading!

 

My top 20 horror novels of the past 70 years!

As it’s almost Christmas, here is a list of my own favourite horror books. These are books that either inspired, terrified me, or made my jaw drop at the sheer beauty of the writing. These are all personal choices, so feel free to disagree. But without further ado, here is the list, in no particular order…

 

rats

The Rats James Herbert

British writer James Herbert was strangely underrated during his lifetime, which is a shame, as he is one of the most frightening horror writers of the 20th century. “The Rats” burst on to the scene in the 1970s, and it still packs a punch today. The huge list of characters, the violence, and the incredible imagery make this a must-read!

Cabal Clive Barker

In the 1980s Clive Barker appeared as a breath of fresh air with his promise to show what other writers only hinted at. Not satisfying with having the monster carry off the maiden, Barker wanted to reveal what happened afterwards. Cabal is his most solid novel, a tale of a man who believes he is a psychopath and takes refuge in a hidden underground city of monsters. The result is a Grand Guignol of the surreal and unnerving. Filmed as the uneven but imaginative “Nightbreed” with David Cronenberg as the bad(der) guy!

 

king

The Stand Stephen King

My first Stephen King entry is the author’s dark take on the apocalypse. It begins with a whimper and ends with a bang.  Filmed twice with varying success, this is some of King’s finest writing. So depressingly realistic that at first I had to give up on it and came back when I was in a lighter mood!

IT Stephen King

The second Stephen King entry on my list is, I think, undeservedly ignored, thanks to a forgettable TV movie. But make no mistake, the novel is King at the peak of his powers. The characters are rich but archetypal, the town of Derry both nostalgic and terrible. And the monster, ah, the monster..!

 

The Doll Who Ate His Mother, Ramsey Campbell

 

A peculiarly British atmosphere pervades this book, set in the poor end of Liverpool. There is a particularly nasty antagonist, but what makes it so memorable is Campbell’s description of urban neglect. Wherever the characters go you feel the empty eyes of forgotten tenements glaring at them. A unique little tale.

bradbury

The October County Ray Bradbury

Few can deny that Ray Bradbury is the American master of the short story. But did you know that this anthology contains an early possible prototype of the Addams Family? These American Gothic fables contain such memorable tales as “The Jar” and “The Emissary”. Packed with gorgeous prose, this is both horror and literary… and funny to boot!

Domain James Herbert

The last entry in the “Rats” series sees survivors of a nuclear holocaust eking out an existence in London’s rubble. Until they find an army of mutated rats waiting for them! Superlative suspense fiction. Every chapter ends on a cliff-hanger. Surely a Hollywood blockbuster waiting to be made!

The Vampire Tapestry Suzy McKee Charnas

A unique take on the vampire genre sees Suzy Charnas’s ancient and wily vampire take on the challenges of the modern world. Never has a vampire been presented in such a detailed psychological light.

The Books of Blood Clive Barker

Yes, all of them! It’s hard to imagine how revolutionary Barker’s fiction was when it first surfaced. These short stories run the gamut from the epic (In the Hills, The Cities) to the eerie (Skins of the Fathers), the surreal  (The Body Politic), the funny (The Yatttring and Jack) and the downright weird (Son of Celluloid). Some have become movie fodder, such as the unforgettably bizarre video nasty “Rawhead Rex”. Others are allegedly in the pipeline. But nothing can prepare you for Barker’s very personal vision of a contemporary world that’s as dark and corrupted as Dante’s inferno!

Interview with The Vampire Anne Rice

The book that launched a publishing legend. I still remember getting lost in the luxuriant Gothic prose. Anne Rice creates a vivid fantasy fever dream that is both like and unlike the movie version. A true masterpiece of fiction.

triffid

Day of the Triffids John Wyndham

British writer John Wyndham’s most well-known book is an example of the “cosy catastrophe”. But that’s why I like it! It’s interesting to see stiff upper lips drop as British society falls apart under attack from some walking plants with the aid of a meteor shower!

Kiss Kiss Roald Dahl

Not just the writer of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Dahl’s short stories were laced with an acerbic wit and grisly imagination. A bit like fairy tales for adults, with added poisoning, brain surgery and insect/baby hybrids!

Ghost Story Peter Straub

Possibly THE great American ghost story. Peter Straub writes far too little horror these days. But this fantastic novel – described by Stephen King as “a tiger tank of a book” – contains virtually every twist on the ghost tale that you can imagine. Oozes atmosphere and quiet menace!

legend

I Am Legend Richard Matheson

With episodes of “The Twilight Zone” and numerous TV movies such as the unforgettable “Duel” and “The Night Stalker”, Richard Matheson inspired a generation of writers.  This is his probably his most famous work – filmed as the languid Vincent Price chiller “The Last Man On Earth”,  the action-packed and very Seventies “The Omega Man” with Charlton Heston, and lately as the CGI-heavy Will Smith popcorn flick, this tale of a man alone in a  world of vampires  has still never been done right. Which is a shame. It’s a fine novel.

The Haunting Shirley Jackson

One of the great ghost stories ever written, it’s amazing how the writer delivers so many effective scares without ever resorting to gore or shocks. Shirley Jackson’s story is a snowball rolling downhill, gathering chills as it goes. Also one very good and one very bad movie.

Teatro Grottesco Thomas Ligotti

Ligotti is one of the writers of the “new weird” – modern authors in the cosmic horror tradition of HP Lovecraft. This collection showcases his unique prose style – a style of flatness and repetition – that lends his words a peculiarly terrifying banality. “The Red Tower” was a particularly fine story. Have fun unpacking the symbolism!

Hour of the Oxrun Dead Charles L Grant

Overlooked by many, Charlie Grant’s Oxrun Station stories all take place in the same sleepy Connecticut town – that just happens to attract all manner of evil! Perhaps it was because these are classic supernatural stories that came out just as writers like King were modernizing old horror tropes. But these are creepy tales, laced with luscious prose. The old TOR versions had the best covers – each one a gorgeous Halloween-themed scene. Ideal for a creepy night in!

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Last Call of Mourning Charles L Grant

My favourite Charlie Grant story keeps you guessing all the way through. The plot sounds simple enough – the heroine returns to Oxrun Station to find her family ‘changed’. They don’t bleed, keep out of the sunlight, and have strange nocturnal habits. But the truth is something you’ll never guess. A masterful book that drips atmosphere and charm.

The Beautiful Thing That Awaits Us All Laird Barron

Barron has erupted onto the horror scene in recent years. This volume represents many of his Lovecraft-meets-Raymond-Chandler style of stories. But that is to do him an injustice. True, “Hand of Glory” is an effective pulp/horror mashup. But other stories show a genuine ability to expose our innermost fears. His eye-catching imagery cannot be easily forgotten.

The Vampire Lestat Anne Rice

Anne Rice second entry in my list is, I think, the most rich of her vampire stories. While I loved the epic scale and sheer ambition of “The Witching Hour”, “The Vampire Lestat” beats it because of the wonderful ironies the author employs. Here we learn who Lestat is, where he came from, his complicated (to say the least) relationship with his mother and his first meeting with Armand. We also learn more about Rice’s vampire mythology. This is both epic and deeply personal. Lestat feels like a living, breathing person. In all of horror, I can’t recall a more well-rounded, charismatic character!

Afterword

What’s missing from this list? Plenty. This is not my “Top 20”. Nor is it meant to be any kind of definitive list. These are just books I’ve loved. Pure examples of the horror genre that are original stories. I’ve not included anything by any “classic” author such as HP Lovecraft, Mary Shelley or Edgar Allen Poe, because everybody knows all about them anyway. Hopefully you feel the same or similar about some of these titles, or if not, I hope you seek them out and find them to your liking!

Enjoy!

Link

Today I have a pretty cool announcement to make.  The anthology REVOLUTIONS, which I edited along with Graeme Shimmin and Craig Pay (with honourable mentions to Luke Shelbourne and the rest of the Manchester Speculative Fiction Group), is now live to buy on Amazon! The anthology is an eclectic mix of science fiction, fantasy and horror, set in Manchester, England. Although perhaps it’s not quite the Manchester you know if you live there…

Revolutions. Available to buy now!

Revolutions. Available to buy now!

This is pretty exciting stuff for me. It’s my first time as an editor. It’s also a chance for me to be able to give back to the Manchester Spec Fic group, a bunch of writers who welcomed me with open arms several years ago. Since then, I’ve obtained invaluable feedback every meeting as they endured my stories (some good, some not so good) and made some great friends in the process.  So my thanks to Craig Pay for keeping the wheel on all this time and for being the very soul of diplomacy!

The idea came to me when I picked up a copy of an anthology in my local library that was brought out by a writers group in the West Midlands. I figured if they could do it, heck, we could do it better! And now I think we have.  But even that wasn’t enough for yours truly. We wanted our anthology to stand out, so we hit upon the idea of setting all the stories in Manchester England, a town that’s often unfairly ignored compared to, say, London, Monaco or any other of those exotic locales! So within these pages you will find various versions of Manchester, whether the present city, a Manchester  of tomorrow, or a Manchester that might never exist at all!

The anthology features stories by myself and other group members as well as Graeme Shimmin, author of the alternate-history spy thriller A Kill In The Morning, and Sarah Jasmon, author of the novel The Summer of Secrets. Both books are available to buy on Amazon. I have to say, Revolutions is a pretty good mix – it includes updated fairy tales, post apocalyptic fiction in a middle-class suburb, some very unique aliens, a musical war between Mancunians and Liverpudlians, and much much more.

So what are you waiting for? Get over to Amazon and grab yourself a copy!